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Scientists discover massive microbe ecosystem living beneath the Earth’s surfaceMassive ‘deep life’ study reveals billions of tonnes of microbes living far beneath Earth’s surface | The IndependentHomeHomeShapeleftrightShapeSocial/FacebookSocial/TwitterShape
Scientists discover massive microbe ecosystem living beneath the Earth’s surfaceMassive ‘deep life’ study reveals billions of tonnes of microbes living far beneath Earth’s surface | The IndependentHomeHomeShapeleftrightShapeSocial/FacebookSocial/TwitterShape





Female frogs prefer city slickers

Science Magazine

This incredible picture shows a huge meteor hurtling to earth during the annual Geminid meteor shower. Taken from the Mojave Desert area near Victorville under a very dark and mostly clear sky, Wally Pacholka captured this amazing picture during the annual cosmic fireworks show.
This incredible picture shows a huge meteor hurtling to earth during the annual Geminid meteor shower. Taken from the Mojave Desert area near Victorville under a very dark and mostly clear sky, Wally Pacholka captured this amazing picture during the annual cosmic fireworks show.

Photo: Tane Sinclair-Taylor
Photo: Tane Sinclair-Taylor

Trends in sea ice thickness/volume are another important indicator of Arctic climate change. While sea ice thickness observations are sparse, here we utilize the ocean and sea ice model, PIOMAS (Zhang and Rothrock, 2003), to visualize September sea ice thickness and volume from 1979 to 2018. Updated through September 2018. (Zach Labe)
Trends in sea ice thickness/volume are another important indicator of Arctic climate change. While sea ice thickness observations are sparse, here we utilize the ocean and sea ice model, PIOMAS (Zhang and Rothrock, 2003), to visualize September sea ice thickness and volume from 1979 to 2018. Updated through September 2018. (Zach Labe)


InSight shares the sounds of wind on Mars

Astronomy Magazine


East Antarctica's glaciers are stirring

BBC News

Planet-Hacking Became More Urgent and Terrifying Than Ever This Year
Planet-Hacking Became More Urgent and Terrifying Than Ever This Year





If collisions between small projectiles -- protons (p), deuterons (d), and helium-3 nuclei (3He) -- and gold nuclei (Au) create tiny hot spots of quark-gluon plasma, the pattern of particles picked up by the detector should retain some 'memory' of each projectile's initial shape. Measurements from the PHENIX experiment match these predictions with very strong correlations between the initial geometry and the final flow patterns. Credit: Javier Orjuela Koop, University of Colorado, Boulder
If collisions between small projectiles -- protons (p), deuterons (d), and helium-3 nuclei (3He) -- and gold nuclei (Au) create tiny hot spots of quark-gluon plasma, the pattern of particles picked up by the detector should retain some 'memory' of each projectile's initial shape. Measurements from the PHENIX experiment match these predictions with very strong correlations between the initial geometry and the final flow patterns. Credit: Javier Orjuela Koop, University of Colorado, Boulder
Hurricane Sandy. Credit: NASA Earth Observatory image by Jesse Allen
Hurricane Sandy. Credit: NASA Earth Observatory image by Jesse Allen


Tiny droplets of early universe matter created

Science Daily
Instrumentation at Beamline 10.0.1 at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source was used to grow and study ultrathin samples of an exotic material known as sodium bismuthide. Credit: Marilyn Chung/Berkeley Lab
Instrumentation at Beamline 10.0.1 at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source was used to grow and study ultrathin samples of an exotic material known as sodium bismuthide. Credit: Marilyn Chung/Berkeley Lab
NASA's Dawn spacecraft captured this 12.5-mile-across close-up of the central peak of the 99-mile-wide Urvara impact crater on Ceres. The remarkable 6,500-foot central ridge is made from materials uplifted from depth, arising from terrains enriched with products of rock-water interactions, such as carbonates. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA
NASA's Dawn spacecraft captured this 12.5-mile-across close-up of the central peak of the 99-mile-wide Urvara impact crater on Ceres. The remarkable 6,500-foot central ridge is made from materials uplifted from depth, arising from terrains enriched with products of rock-water interactions, such as carbonates. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

The curved left forearms bones of the StW 573 Australopithecus skeleton shown with superior toward the top of the image. The ulna (left) is near-lateral view and radius (right) is in anterior view. Credit: Bilateral Asymmetry of the Forearm Bones as Possible Evidence of Antemortem Trauma in the StW 573 Australopithecus Skeleton from Sterkfontein Member 2 (South Africa),
The curved left forearms bones of the StW 573 Australopithecus skeleton shown with superior toward the top of the image. The ulna (left) is near-lateral view and radius (right) is in anterior view. Credit: Bilateral Asymmetry of the Forearm Bones as Possible Evidence of Antemortem Trauma in the StW 573 Australopithecus Skeleton from Sterkfontein Member 2 (South Africa),

Scanning tunnelling microscope installed in a helium cooling device seen from below (with the sample stage removed). The mechanism for positioning the microscope tip above the sample surface is visible (center of image). Credit: Simon Diesch
Scanning tunnelling microscope installed in a helium cooling device seen from below (with the sample stage removed). The mechanism for positioning the microscope tip above the sample surface is visible (center of image). Credit: Simon Diesch

Supercomputers without waste heat





Space does not damage a major part of the immune system, study saysSpace travel does not damage a major part of the human immune system, new study says | The IndependentHomeHomeShapeleftrightShapeSocial/FacebookSocial/Twitter
Space does not damage a major part of the immune system, study saysSpace travel does not damage a major part of the human immune system, new study says | The IndependentHomeHomeShapeleftrightShapeSocial/FacebookSocial/Twitter

Voyager 2: Sailing Among Giant Planets

Space.com